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Delta flights to the Carolina airports have largely resumed Sunday morning after Tropical Depression Florence continues to weaken on its westward track inland. Delta began operating in Charleston, S.C. Saturday afternoon — the first airline to do so — and is also flying its full schedule in Myrtle Beach, S.C. as of Sunday morning, using larger aircraft on select flights. Flights to Fayetteville, N.C. also restarted Sunday afternoon. 

Flight boardThe airline continues to assess conditions at three of the other coastal airports affected by Florence, which sustained damage. New Bern, N.C., (EWN), Wilmington, N.C., (ILM) and Jacksonville, N.C., (OAJ) airports continue to face facility and infrastructure challenges as a result of flooding, power outages and other issues. Delta is eyeing an operational restart to these airports Monday, pending the outcome of a damage evaluation. Delta’s primary concern for customer and employee safety remains a top priority. 

Elsewhere in the Carolinas, Delta is operating normally in Charlotte and Raleigh/Durham N.C., which it did throughout Florence’s impact.

The airline’s meteorology team is keeping an eye on the storm as it is expected to continue across the Carolinas and into the Ohio Valley, bringing heavy rain and strong winds in some places, though no significant disruptions to flights in the region are expected.

Delta issued a travel waiverto allow customers flying to, from or through the storm’s path to make one-time changes to their reservations. A waiver also remains in place for baggage and pet-in-cabin fees. Customers are encouraged to visit Delta.com or use the Fly Delta Mobile App to make changes to their itineraries and get up-to-date flight status updates.

 

Sept. 15 at 3:30 p.m. EST

Hurricane Florence has been downgraded to a tropical storm and continues to move inland over eastern South Carolina. The storm is forecast to turn westward and then northward through the Carolinas and into the Ohio Valley by Monday.

Delta is operating a reduced flight schedule to reflect the airline’s primary concern for customer and employee safety. Since Wednesday, Delta has cancelled nearly 250 scheduled flights as a result of Florence.

Following the re-opening of Charleston, S.C., (CHS) Saturday afternoon, Delta will resume operations with seven arrivals and two departures. All operations at Fayetteville, N.C., (FAY), Jacksonville, N.C., (OAJ), Myrtle Beach, S.C., (MYR), New Bern, N.C., (EWN) and Wilmington, N.C., (ILM) have been cancelled for Saturday and are expected to resume Sunday afternoon pending continued assessments of airport facilities and infrastructure. 

Delta will continue to provide regular updates throughout the storm with updates on airport re-openings and when flights are scheduled to resume from specific airports. Customers are encouraged to visit Delta.com or use the Fly Delta Mobile App to make changes to their itineraries and to monitor flight status updates.

travel waiver remains in place for the area in the storm’s projected path and was expanded Wednesday to include additional cities and cover an extended period of time. A waiver also remains in place for baggage and pet-in-cabin fees.

At 11 a.m. Saturday morning, the center of Florence was located over eastern South Carolina, about 40 miles west of Myrtle Beach and about 40 miles south of Florence, with sustained winds of 45-55 mph. The storm continues to weaken as it moves west into Saturday evening and is forecast to further downgrade to a tropical depression early Sunday morning. 

As flights begin to resume, Delta will dispatch a team of over 30 employees from other unaffected airports to Charleston and other hurricane-impacted airports to provide assistance restarting flight operations. Even as Florence's worst effects diminish, Delta will be keeping a close eye on flooding and damages to city and airport infrastructure that may pose additional challenges to resuming flights. The airline will continue to send supplies such as non-perishable food and water where needed and is also warning airports to the west of the coastal Carolina region to stay alert as conditions and forecast predictions may change. The airline also has a Go Team of ground service equipment mechanics on standby to make repairs should any airport vehicles require maintenance due to flooding.

Sept. 14 at 5:30 p.m. EST

Delta expects to resume flight operations as early as Saturday afternoon in Fayetteville, N.C., (FAY), Myrtle Beach, S.C. (MYR), New Bern, N.C. (EWN), and Wilmington, N.C., (ILM) pending assessments of airport facilities and infrastructure. Jacksonville, N.C. (OAJ) and Charleston, S.C., (CHS) airports are expected to remain closed until Sunday.

Customers are encouraged to visit Delta.com or use the Fly Delta Mobile App to make changes to their flight and get up-to-date flight status updates.

Hurricane Florence is continuing to move westward across North Carolina and into South Carolina. As the storm continues to move inland, encountering larger amounts of drier air across the region, winds will begin to decrease causing Florence to weaken.

As flights begin to resume, Delta will dispatch a team of over 30 employees from other unaffected airports to Charleston and other hurricane-impacted airports to provide assistance restarting flight operations. Even as Florence’s worst effects diminish, Delta will be keeping a close eye on flooding and damages to city and airport infrastructure that may pose additional challenges to resuming flights. The airline will continue to send supplies such as non-perishable food and water where needed and is also warning airports to the west of the coastal Carolina region to stay alert as conditions and forecast predictions may change. The airline also has a Go Team of ground service equipment mechanics on standby to make repairs should any airport vehicles require maintenance due to flooding. 

travel waiver remains in place for the area in the storm’s projected path and was expanded Wednesday to include additional cities and cover an extended period of time. A waiver also remains in place for baggage and pet-in-cabin fees.

 

Sept. 14 at 11:50 a.m. EST

As Hurricane Florence begins to make its impact, Delta is operating a reduced flight schedule to reflect the airline’s primary concern for customer and employee safety. Since Wednesday, Delta has cancelled nearly 200 scheduled flights as a result of Florence.

As the airline makes plans for resuming flights, Delta will maintain a close watch over airport infrastructure and areas with severe flooding that could impede safe flight operations. Fayetteville, N.C., (FAY)​Jacksonville, N.C., (OAJ) , Myrtle Beach, S.C., (MYR)New Bern, N.C., (EWN) and Wilmington, N.C., (ILM) will remain closed for air travel through Friday and could reopen this weekend pending assessments of airport facilities and infrastructure.

Delta will continue to provide regular updates throughout the storm with updates on airport re-openings and when flights are scheduled to resume from specific airports. Customers are encouraged to visit Delta.com or use the Fly Delta Mobile App to make changes to their flight and get up-to-date flight status updates.

travel waiver remains in place for the area in the storm's projected path and was expanded yesterday to include additional cities and cover an extended period of time. A waiver also remains in place for baggage and pet-in-cabin fees.

At 7:15 a.m. Friday morning, Florence was located just south of Wilmington, N.C., as a Category 1 storm, with winds reaching over 100 mph. Cities such as Myrtle Beach and Raleigh-Durham will likely see winds between 50 and 60 mph with potential for over 12 inches of rainfall.

Delta reiterates its call for all in Florence’s path to keep safety as their top priority as the storm begins to make its largest, potentially devastating impact. 

 

Sept. 13 at 5 p.m. EST

Fayetteville, N.C., (FAY)Jacksonville, N.C., (OAJ) , Myrtle Beach, S.C., (MYR), New Bern, N.C., (EWN) and Wilmington, N.C., (ILM)  will remain closed for air travel through the end of Friday as Hurricane Florence continues to impact coastal and inland airports.

Charleston, S.C., (CHS) will remain closed until Friday just after 6 p.m. ET. Pending a facility, infrastructure and airport staffing assessment, Delta expects to operate flight 1971 from Atlanta Friday evening. The airline is planning a Saturday restart at many of the closed airports following similar assessments to ensure flights can safety operate.

Customers are encouraged to visit Delta.com or use the Fly Delta Mobile App to make changes to their flight and get up-to-date flight status updates.

As flights begin to resume, Delta will dispatch a cadre of over 30 employees from other unaffected airports to Charleston and other hurricane-impacted airports to provide assistance restarting flight operations. Even as Florence’s worst effects diminish, Delta will be keeping a close eye on flooding and damages to city and airport infrastructure that may pose additional challenges to resuming flights. The airline will continue to send supplies such as non-perishable food and water where needed and is also warning airports to the west of the coastal Carolina region to stay alert as conditions and forecast predictions may change.

All told, from Wednesday through the day Saturday, Delta has cancelled approximately 175 scheduled flights as a result of Florence.

travel waiver remains in place for the area in the storm’s projected path and was expanded yesterday to include additional cities and cover an extended period of time. A waiver also remains in place for baggage and pet-in-cabin fees.

 

Sept. 13 at Noon EST

Delta has cancelled 70 flights for tomorrow — bringing the total to 150 — due to Hurricane Florence as it continues its slow approach to the Carolina coast. The airline had proactively cancelled nearly 80 flights today as many airports have elected to close in preparation for the storm.

Customers are encouraged to visit Delta.com or use the Fly Delta Mobile App to make changes to their flight and get up-to-date flight status updates as additional adjustments may be necessary pending evaluations to facilities and infrastructure.

The now Category 2 storm remains very strong, with sustained winds near 110 miles per hour and higher gusts. As of 10 a.m. EDT Thursday, Florence is about 170 miles southeast of Wilmington, N.C. and 220 miles east of Myrtle Beach, S.C.; both cities are expected to see gusts of up to 50 miles per hour as it approaches just off shore Thursday evening. According to Delta’s team of meteorologists monitoring the storm, Florence is forecast to slow considerably as it gets closer to the coast, bringing with it torrential rains, flooding and damaging winds. Thousands are already without power, with many more expected over the course of the storm.

Teams in the airline’s Operations and Customer Center will remain in constant contact with Delta’s teams throughout the region as well as local authorities to provide assistance up to and throughout Florence’s impact. The airline began shipping supplies Wednesday in an effort to help employees on the ground safely weather the dangerous storm. Delta continues to stress the critical importance of keeping safety the airline’s primary focus throughout Hurricane Florence.

In a planned effort to help offset some of the anticipated necessary cancellations, Delta operated nearly 1,200 extra seats through the affected area over the past three days on extra flights and upsized aircraft for regularly scheduled flights. Delta has a history of adding flights and upsizing aircraft ahead of storms to aid in evacuation efforts as well as providing additional cargo and passenger lift post-storm to aid in relief efforts.

A travel waiver remains in place for the area in the storm’s projected path and was expanded yesterday to include additional cities and cover an extended period of time. A waiver also remains in place for baggage and pet-in-cabin fees.

 

Sept. 12 at 6 p.m. EST

Delta has proactively cancelled approximately 85 flights, primarily scheduled for Thursday, to and from cities along the storm’s path as Hurricane Florence continues its approach to the Carolina coast.

Airports in Charleston, S.C., Fayetteville, N.C., Jacksonville, N.C., and Wilmington, N.C., announced they will close Wednesday evening after the arrival of most flights and will remain closed through Thursday, possibly longer. Additional adjustments to flights may be necessary after facilities and infrastructure evaluations. Customers are encouraged to visit Delta.com or use the Fly Delta Mobile App to make changes to their flight and get up-to-date flight status updates.

Delta has added a total of 1,200 seats via extra flights and upsized aircraft in the storm's path. The airline has also expanded its travel waiver to include Asheville, N.C., (AVL), Augusta, Ga., (AGS) and Greenville/Spartanburg S.C., (GSP) in addition to extending the impacted travel dates covered by the waiver through Sept. 17. The airline has also waived baggage and pet-in-cabin fees.

Adding more seats to the schedule before Florence’s impact is part of Delta’s effort to help residents leave the area ahead of the storm, which is expected to bring rainfall totaling more than 20 inches and destructive winds projected to reach speeds of over 100 mph around Wilmington, N.C., and Myrtle Beach, S.C. Delta has a history of adding flights and upsizing aircraft before storms to help evacuation efforts as well as providing additional cargo and passenger capacity after storms to aid in relief efforts.

The airline remains in constant contact with local airline employees and leaders to address the needs of customers and employees as they face the Category 3 storm. Delta has already sent critical supplies such as water, satellite phones for use in case cellular networks are disrupted, and other devices to help employees operate ticket counter and gate functions in the event of power outages. A customer service employee Go Team is at the ready to travel to the most affected airports if necessary to provide assistance to restart flight operations once airports reopen.

Delta leaders emphasized employee safety during an operational briefing Wednesday afternoon, with one leader saying, “Nothing is more important than taking care of our employees and customers. Make sure you’re in a safe place to ride out this storm well in advance of this storm impacting your location. Look at emergency action plans and ensure you’re prepared.”

John Laughter, Delta’s Senior Vice President of Safety, Security & Compliance, added, “Put your own safety and your team’s safety first. That’s the best way we can support ourselves and our customers.”

 

Sept. 12 at 10 a.m. EST

As Hurricane Florence makes its way toward the coastal North Carolina-South Carolina border, Delta has added over 1,000 extra seats on larger aircraft and extra flights to and from the affected cities to assist with evacuation efforts for those in Florence’s path.

Up to and through the time Florence makes landfall, Delta will evaluate possible flight changes and cancellations as additional information on updated weather forecasts, potential airport closures, evacuation warnings and conditions on the ground dictate. The airline continues to monitor for further directives and information from state and local officials.

Additionally, Delta’s team of meteorologists continue to evaluate the latest weather models. The airline’s Strategic Planning Team is working with local station and airport management to monitor conditions on the ground and maintain a steady flow of information.

Currently well off the coast, weather forecasts show the storm making landfall Friday evening and stretching into Saturday morning. Predictions suggest that Florence will likely move westward primarily through South Carolina as the storm begins to weaken.

Ahead of the storm, Delta put in place and subsequently expanded a severe weather waiver for cities stretching from Savannah, Ga. to Charlottesville, Va. The airline also waived checked baggage fees and pet-in-cabin fees in addition to capping fares on several markets in the storm’s path.

Customers are encouraged to visit Delta.com or use the Fly Delta mobile app to make changes to their flight and get up-to-date flight status updates.

Learn more about actions that Delta takes during major storms.

 

Sept. 11 at 5:15 p.m. EST

Delta’s team of meteorologists in the airline’s Operations and Customer Center continue to actively monitor the projected path of Hurricane Florence as it makes its way toward coastal North Carolina.

In anticipation of Florence’s arrival, the airline has added cities and expanded its weather waiver to include markets from Savannah, Ga. (SAV) to Charlottesville, Va. (CHO) and has also implemented a baggage fee waiver for checked bags for customers flying from select cities. Delta is also waiving pet in cabin fees, to and from select cities, from September 10-17.

This weather waiver applies to customers traveling to, from or through these cities will be able to make changes to their currently booked flights without incurring a change fee.

The storm is projected to make landfall late Thursday night or early Friday morning, according to current forecasts, and is expected to linger in the area through the weekend, dumping significant amounts of rain, before making its way inland on Monday of next week.

As of approximately 12:30 p.m., Hurricane Florence was making its way through the southwestern Atlantic Ocean, approximately 400 miles to the south of Bermuda and 900 miles east of North Carolina moving in a west-northwest trajectory as a Category 4 storm with winds of close to 150 miles per hour.

Decisions regarding flight cancellations or other disruptions at airports along the coastal Southeast are expected approximately 24 hours prior to the storm making landfall. In addition to flight disruptions caused by the storm’s impact, cancellations may also be driven by conditions on the ground at airports in Florence’s path, such as severe flooding, power outages or other infrastructure constraints. Delta also continues to monitor for any updates from state and local officials as evacuation warnings are issued.

As always, Delta’s top priority is ensuring the safety of our customers and employees.

For more information on actions that Delta takes during major storms, please see our story posted this morning to the Delta News Hub.

 

Sept. 11 at 9:30 a.m. EST

As Delta’s team of meteorologists continue to monitor the projected pathway of Hurricane Florence, the airline has proactively issued fare price caps for select coastal and inland cities from Savannah, Ga., up to Richmond, Va. Fares range by cabin, flight distance and market from as low as $299 in Main Cabin up to $799 in the forward cabin.

Delta has also proactively issued a weather waiver for affected airports ahead of Florence’s landfall, which was recently upgraded to a Category 4 hurricane.

Airports covered by the waiver include:

  • Charleston, SC (CHS)
  • Fayetteville, NC (FAY)
  • Greensboro, NC (GSO)
  • Jacksonville, NC (OAJ)
  • Norfolk, VA (ORF)
  • New Bern, NC (EWN)
  • Myrtle Beach, SC (MYR)
  • Newport News, VA (PHF)
  • Raleigh-Durham, NC (RDU)
  • Richmond, VA (RIC)
  • Savannah, GA (SAV)
  • Wilmington, NC (ILM)

This weather waiver allows customers traveling to, from or through the affected cities through Sept. 16, to make a one-time change to their travel plans without incurring a fee. As always, customers are encouraged to check Delta.com or the Fly Delta Mobile App for their latest flight status.

This article was updated Tuesday morning to add Charleston, S.C., and Savannah, Ga., to the waiver list.

 

Sept. 09 at 4 p.m. EST

​Delta's teams in the Operations and Customer Center are keeping an eye on Hurricane Florence as it moves west-northwest towards the U.S. East Coast.

The airline's team of meteorologists has been watching the storm since it first developed in the Atlantic last week causing en route weather concerns for flights between the U.S. and Africa. Current, long-range forecasts predict Hurricane Florence will continue to strengthen and gain speed as it moves west towards the U.S. East Coast. Earlier forecasts were tracking the storm to move east of Bermuda, keeping it in the sea.

On the forecast track, the center of Florence will move over the warm waters of the southwestern Atlantic Ocean through Wednesday and is expected to make landfall late Thursday night into early Friday morning of next week.

At this time, it is too soon to determine the exact location, magnitude and timing of Florence's impact to the airports and communities Delta serves. This level of detail typically is more predictable within 48 hours of the storm reaching landside. Delta's meteorology team uses a combination of satellite data and a number of storm models created by government agencies worldwide to storm monitor trends.

As always, customers are encouraged to check Delta.com or the Fly Delta Mobile App for the most up-to-date flight status information.  ​​

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