A Tokyo native and Delta customer service agent offers up all her best tips for exploring the city, from “locals-only” spots and perfect day trips to must-visit parks for viewing stunning autumn leaves.
DELTA NEWS ON THE GO. Subscribe and follow.

Some cities are most well known for their cuisine, while others are known for their history or beautiful sights. But Tokyo? It’s a city that has it all. 

“In Tokyo, you get to enjoy advanced technology, historical sights, beautiful nature and delicious foods all at the same time,” said Mayumi Saito, a Delta Customer Service Agent at Haneda Airport. 

Since birth, Mayumi has lived in a town just a few miles east Tokyo, and one of her favorite things about the city is that each area has its own unique atmosphere. All are easily reached by train or car. 

Delta Customer Service Agent Mayumi Saito visits Senso-Ji, a Buddhist temple in Asakusa that is Tokyo's oldest temple.  

“Ginza is known as a place for shopping and gourmet,” Mayumi said. “You can see the youth’s ‘kawaii’ culture in Shibuya and Harajuku, enjoy the old Japanese culture in Asakusa, and experience nature in Hamarikyu and Hibiya Park. You can go to multiple locations, depending on your purpose or feeling of the day.” 

With the reopening of Japan to tourists and the addition of Delta’s new Sky Club in Haneda Airport, there is never a better time than now to pay a visit to the city. 

Located on the fifth floor of Terminal 3, the new Delta Sky Club at Haneda Airport features a premium bar serving seasonal cocktails, wines, beers, spirits and Japanese sake – all complimentary for guests.

Those traveling to Tokyo will fly into Haneda, the closest airport to the center of the city. Haneda is a critical international hub for Delta and offers travel options from multiple U.S. gateways including Seattle, Atlanta, Los Angeles and Detroit on our flagship A350-900 aircraft or the latest A330-900neo. Both aircraft feature four experiences: Delta One suites, Delta Premium Select, Delta Comfort + and Main Cabin.  

BOOK | Tokyo packages with Delta Vacations 

Ready to start planning your trip? Let Mayumi be your guide to some of the most beautiful and unique experiences that the bustling Japanese city has to offer. 

AUTUMN AND WINTER IN TOKYO 

While there’s never a bad time to explore Tokyo, Mayumi suggests visiting during the cooler months for stunning views. 

“We have pleasant weather in the autumn and winter seasons here in Tokyo,” she said. “Leaves on the trees turn yellow and red, and you can enjoy visiting beautiful gardens and parks in the center of the city.” 

Leaves on the trees in Tokyo turn yellow and red in autumn, and you can enjoy visiting beautiful gardens and parks in the center of the city.

With the multitude of parks and gardens that Tokyo has to offer, choosing one to traverse can seem daunting, but Mayumi recommends Rikugien Gardens, Shinjuku Gyoen, and Yoyogi Park.  

If you have time for a day trip, Mount Takao is a 1,965-foot-high mountain located just west of Tokyo. Here, you can attend the Mount Takao Autumn Leaves Festival that is held throughout November every year.  

“While the main attraction is the autumn colors for which the area is famous, various performances such as Taiko drumming and musical recitals are held in the station plaza,” said Mayumi. 

MUST-SEE LANDMARKS 

There’s no shortage of things to see and do in Tokyo, but for first-time visitors (and even long-time visitors that can never get enough of a good view!), Mayumi recommends visiting these Tokyo hot spots:   

Tokyo Skytree: The highlight of the city’s 634-meter digital terrestrial broadcasting tower are two observation decks, which offer spectacular views out over Tokyo. “The view of Mt. Fuji in the evening is stunning,” said Mayumi. 

The highlight of Tokyo's 634-meter Tokyo Skytree are two observation decks, which offer spectacular views out over the city.

Senso-Ji: This Buddhist temple in Asakusa is Tokyo's oldest temple.  

Delta Customer Service Agent Mayumi Saito visits Senso-Ji, a Buddhist temple in Asakusa that is Tokyo's oldest temple.  

Hakone: Only a 1.5-hour express train ride from Tokyo, this mountainous town has excellent hot springs as well as the famous Hakone Shrine – a Shinto shrine with a red “torii” gate overlooking Lake Ashi. 

LOCALS ONLY 

Playing the part of the tourist when visiting Tokyo, especially for your first visit, is encouraged, because you’d be remiss not to experience some of the city’s most well-known sights and enjoy beloved food like sushi and ramen. But if you’d like to stray off the beaten path, the following experiences and food are some of Mayumi’s favorites: 

Team Lab Planets TOKYO: An art facility that utilizes the latest digital technology, this exhibition can be enjoyed by children and adults alike and is open until the end of 2023. 

An art facility that utilizes the latest digital technology, Team Lab Planets TOKYO can be enjoyed by children and adults alike and is open until the end of 2023

Vending machines: You will see vending machines everywhere in Tokyo, but these aren’t your ordinary vending machines. You can find machines filled with a variety of products, like dashi (a Japanese soup stock), umbrellas and bananas. “There are also unique vending machines at Haneda Airport, including airlines' in-flight meals, instant noodles of Japan's local specialties and freshly made ramen,” added Mayumi. 

You can find unique vending machines all over Tokyo filled with a variety of products, like dashi (a Japanese soup stock), umbrellas and bananas.

Oden: “In winter people enjoy Oden, a Japanese one-pot dish with fishcakes, at home or in casual restaurants,” said Mayumi. “Even convenience stores sell Oden during winter. It reminds us that winter has come.”  

SHOPPING IN TOKYO 

If you want to pick up a souvenir or two before heading back home, Mayumi suggests visiting Kyukyodo in Ginza. This shop has been selling incense, Japanese paper goods and calligraphy supplies since 1663 – all of which make perfect gifts for friends or family members. 

If you want to pick up a souvenir in Tokyo, Kyukyodo in Ginza, which has been selling goods since 1663, sells incense, Japanese paper goods and calligraphy supplies.
If you want to pick up a souvenir in Tokyo, Kyukyodo in Ginza, which has been selling goods since 1663, sells incense, Japanese paper goods and calligraphy supplies.

Japanese souvenirs can also be found at Nakamise shopping street in Asakusa and Kabukiza in Ginza.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A guide shared by Delta Air Lines (@delta)

Related Topics:
Share